Courses Offered by the American Sign Language Program

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These courses are currently available through the American Sign Language Program (not all courses are taught in every semester). 

ASL:1001
American Sign Language I 
(158:011)
4 s.h. 

Approved for GE: Foreign Language.
This course is part of a possible sequence of courses approved for GE: Foreign Language.

This is an introductory course in American Sign Language (ASL). Note that this in not a course in "Signed English." ASL is a distinct, natural language with rules of grammar and usage as different from English as any foreign language. Consequently, a course in ASL is comparable to, and no less difficult or rigorous than, other language courses. The class meets four hours per week with an additional hour of lab study required. Exams test both expressive and receptive skills, including the use of appropriate vocabulary, grammar, functional usage, and cultural knowledge. This is the first course in a four-semester sequence of courses.

Taught in American Sign Language.

 

ASL:1002
American Sign Language II 
(158:012)
4 s.h. 

Approved for GE: Foreign Language.
This course is part of a possible sequence of courses approved for GE: Foreign Language.

Prerequisite: 158:011 or consent of instructor.

This course is a continuation of 158:011. Advanced grammatical constructions and vocabulary are introduced. Goals for the course include improved conversational fluency as well as familiarity with American Deaf culture. The class meets four hours per week with an additional hour of lab study required. Exams test both expressive and receptive skills, including the use of appropriate vocabulary, grammar, functional usage, and cultural knowledge. Classes are conducted entirely in American Sign Language. This is the second course in a four-semester sequence of courses.

Taught in American Sign Language.


ASL:2001
American Sign Language III
  (158:013)
4 s.h. 

Approved for GE: Foreign Language.
This course is part of a possible sequence of courses approved for GE: Foreign Language.

Prerequisite: 158:012 or consent of instructor.

This course is a continuation of 158:011 and 158:012. Advanced grammatical constructions and vocabulary are introduced. Goals for the course include improved conversational fluency as well as familiarity with American Deaf culture. The class meets four hours per week with an additional hour of lab study required. Exams test both expressive and receptive skills, including the use of appropriate vocabulary, grammar, functional usage, and cultural knowledge. Classes are conducted entirely in American Sign Language. This is the third course in a four-semester sequence of courses. 

Taught in American Sign Language.


ASL:2002
American Sign Language IV
  (158:014)
4 s.h. 

Approved for GE: Foreign Language.
This course is part of a possible sequence of courses approved for GE: Foreign Language.

Prerequisite: 158:013 or consent of instructor.

This course is a continuation of 158:011, 158:012, and 158:013. Advanced grammatical constructions and vocabulary are introduced. Goals for the course include improved conversational fluency as well as familiarity with American Deaf culture. The class meets four hours per week with an additional hour of lab study required. Exams test both expressive and receptive skills, including the use of appropriate vocabulary, grammar, functional usage, and cultural knowledge. Classes are conducted entirely in American Sign Language. This is the fourth course in a four-semester sequence of courses.

Taught in American Sign Language.


ASL:1101
Fingerspelling and Numbers I
  (158:015)
1 s.h. 

Prerequisite: 158:011

The student will learn how to articulate all the letters, numbers, and loan signs of ASL; develop accuracy in regard to letter formation, palm orientation and hand position; fingerpell words clearly and accurately; recognize words, numbers and loan signs fingerspelled at different rates; and recognize fingerspelled words or word groups while eye gaze is on signer's face.

Taught in American Sign Language.


ASL:4201
History of the American Deaf Community
  (158:100)
3 s.h. 

Prerequisite for the lecture: none (3 s.h. option).
Prerequisite or co-requisite for the discussion section: 158:014 or consent of the instructor (4 s.h. option).

In this course we will explore the creation of a distinct language and culture of Deaf people in America during the 19th and 20th centuries. We will discuss how the meaning of deafness has changed in response to larger cultural and social changes in American history, and what effects these changes have had upon educational and social policies. We will address questions such as why American Sign Language was suppressed for most of the 20th century, how the Deaf community maintained its language and culture in the face of persistent opposition, and why American Sign Language has again become a subject of fascination in both academia and popular culture, as it was in the nineteenth century.

This course can count toward the minor in ASL when taken for 4 s.h. with the one hour discussion in ASL.

Same as 16A:104


ASL:3200
Topics in Deaf Studies
  (158:101)
3 s.h. 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: 158:014 or permission of the instructor

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with current topics in Deaf Studies while also improving conversational fluency in American Sign Language. Classes emphasize discussion of shared readings, presentations, and small group work. Topics include Deaf culture and language, ASL literature, issues in deaf education, Deaf / hearing relationships, deafness in movies and fiction, and deaf-related professions. A community participation and service learning component offers various options for visits to schools and programs for deaf students, participation in Deaf community events, and teaching ASL to children. Grades are based upon presentations, a term paper, two written exams, community and classroom participation (ASL fluency is not graded). 

Taught in American Sign Language.


ASL:3600
American Sign Language Literature
  (158:103)
3 s.h. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: 158:014 or consent of instructor.

This course will introduce students to the world of American Sign Language literature, as recorded on videotape and film (and whenever possible, in live performance). ASL literature encompasses traditional folklore, story telling, poetry, drama, oratory, jokes, and non-fiction narrative. Students will learn to analyze these genres in their social and cultural contexts as expressions of Deaf experience, and explore how historical and current issues in Deaf culture are represented in literary form.

Taught in American Sign Language.


ASL:3400
Issues in ASL and Deaf Studies
  (158:104)
3 s.h. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: 158:014 or consent of instructor.

This course will introduce students to issues in ASL and Deaf Studies. The focus will be on linguistics, culture, and literacy. However, the primary focus may change each semester.

Taught in American Sign Language.


ASL:3500
Deafness in the Media
  (158:105)
3 s.h. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: 158:014 or consent of instructor.

Exploration of the construct of deafness through mainstream media (e.g., commercial television, movies, fictional and nonfictional literature in print and on the Internet); various ways deaf people are constructed and presented for hearing audiences from the past 20 years, including deaf as long-suffering victims, deaf as heroes overcoming adversity, deaf as rebels against the mainstream, and deaf as lonely outcasts.

Taught in American Sign Language.


ASLE:2500
Introduction to ASL Interpreting
  (158:106)
3 s.h. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: 158:013 or consent of instructor.

This course will provide students with an introduction to the field of sign language interpreting, it will explore: the history and current nature of the field; the variety of opportunities available; certification training, and ethics.

Taught in spoken English.


ASLE:3905
Teaching Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students
  (158:110)
3 s.h. 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

This course discusses deaf education-related issues: management techniques, communication strategies, teaching strategies, instructional materials, hands-on activities, assessments, and parent involvement. Additional issues relating to the use of technology, ethnic and cultural diversity, classroom management, pre-reading techniques, literacy development, and educational program options also will be discussed. This class incorporates PowerPoint presentations, group discussions, in-class activities, reading assignments, student presentations, and written exams. Course taught in ASL with sign language interpreters. Textbook required: Teaching Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students: Content, Strategies, and Curriculum by Steward, David & Kluwin, Thomas 2001.

This course can count toward the minor in ASL when taken with the one hour discussion in ASL . That course is a 4 s.h. course.

Taught in American Sign Language/English by Harper.
Fluency in American Sign Language is not required.

Same as 07U:110


ASL:3100
American Sign Language Conversation
  (158:111)
3 s.h. 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: 158:014 or permission of the instructor

In this course, students will learn how to:
• converse on common topics such as sports, politics, religion, health, food, weather, shopping, and news;
• begin and end conversations, request clarification, interrupt and take turns, change the subject, tell stories, run meetings, and make presentations;
• use common ASL structures such as topic/comment, scene-setting, and temporal sequencing;
• communicate in various circumstances, such as using English word order, voicing while signing, interpreting in informal situations.

Grades are based on consistent attendance and participation, mastery of the material as demonstrated in short written assignments, simulations, skits, individual and group presentations, and participation in outside-of-class activities using ASL.

Taught in American Sign Language.